Red Wines

Import Selection: Aglianico Del Vulture, 1985. D’Angelo

As the French have their noble grapes of the respective regions, so do the Italians. In Bordeaux France, for instance, Cabernet Sauvignon, Cabernet Franc, Petit Verdot, Malbec and Merlot are the noble grapes. In Italy, the three noble vines are Nebbiolo (respon­sible for Barolo and Barberesco etc.), Sangiovese (responsible for Chianti and Brunello di Montelcino… read more »

Domestic Selection: Zinfandel, 1991. Bogle Vineyards

Chris Bogle is the fifth genera­tion of Bogies to farm the fertile Sacramento River Delta region of northern California. In 1968, Chris helped his father, Warren, plant their first vineyard. Then, in 1973, they formed Bogle Vine­yards. With nearly 650 acres under vine, the winery is virtually self sufficient in fruit. In some cases, however,… read more »

Domestic Selection: RS Reserve, 1989. William Wheeler

Bill and Ingrid Wheeler, own­ers of the William Wheeler Win­ery, met while Bill was posted in South America as a U.S. Foreign Service officer. In 1970 they bought a 175 acre Sonoma County ranch. They planted their first vineyard (Cabernet Sauvignon) during 1973-1974 and harvested their first grapes in 1975 (these they “sold off”). They… read more »

Import Selection: Shiraz/Cabernet Sauvignon, 1991. Hardys

Hardys is Australia’s second largest wine producer. The compa­ny dates back to 1953, when Thomas Hardy, just 23 years old, founded Bankside Cellars, three miles from Adelaide in the then “Colony of South Australia”. Ex­hibiting a pioneering spirit, an ex­cellent head for business and a nat­ural flair for wine making, the energetic young man from… read more »

Domestic Selection: Pinot Noir, 1988. Paraiso Springs

Paraiso Hot Springs are situat­ed in the Santa Lucia foothills, 40 minutes south of Salinas in North­ern California’s Monterey County. While establishing the Soledad Mission, Franciscan padres used the springs’ curative waters for healing purposes. The monks also planted early vineyards there. Two hundred years later (1973), current owner Richard Smith planted mod­ern vineyards, eleven… read more »

Import Selection: Cotes du Rhone, 1990. Moillard

The venerable French wine producing firm Moillard was founded in 1850 by Symphorien Moillard. It is now managed by the fourth and fifth generations, and remains a family owned and oper­ated concern. While 60% of Moil-lard’s turnover is achieved in France, its wines are sold interna­tionally in over 30 countries. The elite part of the… read more »

Domestic Selection: Zinfandel, 1990. Cline Cellars

Cline Cellars is owned by a fami­ly whose name is a household word. About a century ago, six brothers pooled their resources to put the eldest one through college, a cultural tradition in Italy. The brothers immigrated to California. They took odd jobs, in the mines, for the railroads, even as farm la­borers picking fruit… read more »

Import Selection: Tempranillo, 1988. Juame Serra

In the year 1647, on top of a hill that slopes down to the Medi­terranean, in what is now the prov­ince of Cataluna (Catalonia) in Spain, someone constructed a farmhouse in the likeness of a mediaeval fortress. Two hundred years later, this imposing property became a winery, Las Cavas Jaume Serra. Surrounding the cavas (caves… read more »

Domestic Selection: Cabernet Sauvignon, 1988. Lone Oak

In 1974, the Smith horse ranch and the Hook cattle ranch were converted into vineyards. A good 250 acres of vines were planted there, split between Cabernet Sau­vignon, Merlot and Cabernet Franc. Thus was the Smith and Hook Estate created as a Cabernet Sauvignon “chateau”. Our selection comes from the Lone Oak Estate, a separate… read more »

Import Selection: Chianti, 1990. Melini Borghi D’Elsa

Founded in 1705, the Melini winery owns 225 acres of vine­yards in Tuscany, home to many of Italy’s finest red wines. Melini stands as one of the top four pro­ducers in the renowned Chianti re­gion there. This wine gets its name for the villages (borghi) along the River Elsa and comes from their modern facility… read more »

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